Bernedoodle: Bernese Mountain Dog Poodle Mix

The Bernedoodle is the perfect Doodle that doubles up as a therapy dog and is great to be around after a long day at work. 

You might already be familiar with their other nickname, the Bernese Mountain Poo. These dogs are extremely friendly and have a good mix of both parents, the Miniature or Standard Poodle and Bernese.

Their friendly nature makes them great family pets and great dogs to own if you’re looking for a companion for your children. But, alongside their friendly personality and family nature, there’s more that makes the Bernedoodle so great. 

Little-Known Facts About The Bernedoodle

If you’re planning on bringing a Bernedoodle into your life, there are some interesting facts you might want to know before deciding to own one. After all, you must have in-depth knowledge if you plan on owning one. So here are some snippets of info you must know:

  • Unique history: The Bernedoodle is a new dog that only first came onto the breeding scene in 2003. Unlike some Doodles, this is really new! It’s believed they were first bred to serve as fantastic companion dogs and not a show dog. 
  • They’re great pets: If you opt for a Bernedoodle as your pet, be assured that these dogs are great companions for humans. Their super friendly demeanor makes it easier for the people to get attached to them. If you have kids at home and are skeptical of getting a dog because of friendliness issues, get a Bernedoodle today! 
  • Bernedoodles and their recognized Kennel Clubs: As they’re a hybrid, they’re not officially recognized by the American Kennel Club. Plus, as Bernedoodles are quite a rare form of Doodle, it can be challenging to find the required recognition. However, there are some Kennel Clubs that do recognize them, which are: 
  1. Designer Breed Registry
  2. American Canine Hybrid Club
  3. Designer Dogs Kennel Club 
  4. International Designer Canine Registry 

These are just a few well-known facts to consider when buying a Bernedoodle. 

What’s the Bernedoodle Price?

You can expect to pay between $2,000-$5,000 for a Bernedoodle puppy. However, a Bernedoodle puppy of the standard size, well-bred, well-trained, and have absolutely good health would cost a little more than the usual. Also, remember if you’re buying one, you will have to consider their vet bills, vaccinations, toys, bedding, food, and more. 

Bernedoodle: Bernese Mountain Dog Poodle Mix

A Bernedoodle’s price can be subjective based on its size. After all, they could be smaller or bigger based on if they have a Miniature or Standard Poodle parent. Plus, other factors like the dog’s location, breeder’s reputation, characteristics, and health may influence the final cost.

Other large doodle breeds I’ve covered and you should read are the Sheepadoodle and the Cadoodle, so go ahead and check them out.

Are they hypoallergenic? 

While its Bernese parent is not a hypoallergenic breed and is heavy shedder, this Doodle tends to inherit more from its Poodle parent. The strong genes it inherits allow them to shed very little and have little dander. Therefore, they’re seen as hypoallergenic and a good Doodle to own for allergy sufferers. 

Temperament and Intelligence

The Bernedoodle is a dog with no aggressive trait in its body. Their nice and calm temperament makes them an all-rounder dog for family and friends. In their downtime, they love to Goof around and have a lot of playtime. Not just that, but they’re incredibly loyal to their family members and will never leave their side. Alongside their charming nature, they also inherit the Poodle’s intelligence, making them a quick learner for cool tips and tricks. 

Food & Diet Requirements 

When it comes to feeding the Bernedoodle, you’ll want to do it in regular intervals and in small portions. You must do this because they’re a large breed that can easily suffer from stomach problems like bloat. 

Their food should contain a well-balanced supply of vitamins and minerals to ensure their joints and cartilages develop well in their body. It’s important all nutrient groups are considered and that your dog has constant access to fresh drinking water. Ideally, try to give them wet or raw dog food that contains fewer carbohydrates instead of dry food. 

To know more about what brands to feed them and the type of food, it’s always a good idea to consult your local veterinarian. When doing this, they will be able to consider your dog’s weight, age, and health conditions. Whatever they advise, it should be ok as Bernedoodles are not a picky breed!

Bernedoodle: Bernese Mountain Dog Poodle Mix

Bernedoodle Full-Grown Sizes 

If you plan on owning a Bernedoodle, there are three sizes they typically come in, which are the following:

TinyMiniatureStandard
Weight12-17in/31-44cm18-22in/45-56cm23-29 in/58-73cm
Height20-24lbs/45-11kg25-49lbs/11-22kg70-90lbs/31-40kgs

Life Expectancy 

The typical lifespan of a Bernedoodle ranges from 12-18 years. Often the Miniature Bernedoodle has a larger lifespan than the standard Bernedoodle. 

Exercise

It can be challenging to determine the exercise needs of the Bernedoodle. After all, their Poodle parent is known to be an active working dog that requires constant physical and mental stimulation; they love having a job to do. Yet, at the same time, the Bernese Mountain Dog is calmer and laid back about the world around them. 

The unpredictability of the genes they inherit could make them either a highly active dog or a lazy dog that takes some motivation to exercise.

Moreover, it can take some time for active Bernedoodles to mature, so they should only undergo short intervals of exercise several times a day. Doing this will prevent their bones and joints from getting damaged, making it easier for them.

Regarding their exercise, it’s also essential to know if your Bernedoodle inherits a thick coat like its Bernese parent, then you should be conscious of where they exercise. As their coat tends to be more suited for the alps, they’re not a dog that does well exercising in high temperatures or the summer. Because of this, exercise is best suited for late in the evening or early morning when the weather is cooler.

Training 

While the Bernedoodle does inherit the intelligent nature from its Poodle parent, it still requires to be trained from an early age. If you don’t do this, your dog could easily develop separation anxiety and cause you a lot of difficulties doing so. 

Bernedoodle: Bernese Mountain Dog Poodle Mix

Therefore, simple house training, obedience training, and socialization will allow them to thrive as adults. Always use positive reinforcement techniques when training them, rewarding them with a treat or toy when they’ve done a good behavior. 

In addition to physical training, it’s equally important that this dog is mentally stimulated. After all, mental stimulation can significantly affect how this dog can be trained.

To do this, you’ll want to keep their mind sharp at all times and their training simple. Therefore when training, give them a new command to do every 3-4 days or so. Doing this will allow them to feel the challenge and not be too overwhelmed or distressed. 

Bernedoodle Grooming

Just like any other breed, you must set a good amount of time out each week to groom a Bernedoodle. While they may be low shedders, you will still want to brush them 2-3 times a week, especially if they inherit more of a curlier coat from their Poodle parent. Doing this will remove any tangles, dirt, and debris from their hair, saving you time when bathing them. Alongside this, you should aim to bathe a Bernedoodle every 3-4 weeks to stop their coat from getting dirty, and you might want to get a professional groomer to do this. 

Bernedoodle Health Conditions

For the most part, Bernedoodles are healthier dogs than their Poodle or Bernese parent. While inbreeding can produce a range of health complications, crossbreeding rarely does. Moreover, as this Doodle is relatively new to the dog world, there’s not a lot of health information about them. However, it’s thought that diseases like cancer may be lower in the Bernedoodle than in their Bernese Mountain dog parent. Alongside this, they are known to inherit some conditions like the following potentially: 

Biologically, mixing two breeds often results in the formulation of a better breed. This means that most Bernedoodle dogs are healthier than both their parents. However, certain medical conditions that they may undergo are as follows: 

  • Hip Dysplasia 
  • Elbow Dysplasia
  • Eye problems
  • Hot spots

While it’s not always guaranteed that a Bernedoodle will inherit these, you should always take them to a vet to rule out their health problems with regular checkups. 

Male vs. Female Bernedoodle

Between the two genders, there are not any significant differences that occur. The only one that stands out is that the female is a bit easier to train as they’re independent, whereas the males tend to have more stubborn traits.

On the other hand, males tend to have more goofier personalities than females. 

Conclusion

Overall, the Bernedoodle is a fantastic canine if you have a family or are a first-time dog owner. They love to play and socialize with any human, having no aggressive elements. 

If you plan on owning a Bernedoodle, you must provide them with small exercise intervals a day. Because of this, it might not be wise to own them if no one is available to address this need in the house. Otherwise, they’re not a dog that shed much and has very few demands compared to other Doodles.

What interests you about the Bernedoodle? Let us know in the comments below.

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MarkoPoodle

Marko Is the Founder and Director of Marketing at PoodleHQ. He is a proud owner of 3 generations of poodles, a lifelong canine enthusiast and adores animals of all shapes and sizes!

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